Book Review: The Unfaithful Widow Ten Years Later




Barbara Barth's memoir is by far one of the most fun reads I have had in a long time.  The Unfaithful Widow Ten Years Later is a compilation of stories about the resilience, the confusion, the fear and the enjoyment of Barth's life.  Woven throughout the memoir are glimpses of her great love for dogs, her life as a writer/antique dealer and her sometimes questioning belief in serendipity.

I really enjoyed how Barbara laughs at herself, sees her own foibles and quickly points out the talents and gifts of other people. A dog lover, myself, I fell in love with the four-legged family of this book. When I got to the last chapter, I felt like my new best friend had just moved across the ocean.  I wanted to know more about this gregarious woman and her dogs. 

I highly recommend this book for everyone who believes the fun really starts after the first century of life. My thanks to Barbara for sharing her life in such an open and enjoyable memoir. 

 

Barbara Barth is an author, blogger, sometimes antique dealer, dog hoarder. Widowed eleven years ago, Barth writes about finding a creative path back to happiness. Her recent move to a 1906 historic cottage brought many surprises, including discovering the Monroe–Walton Center for the Arts, where she started the monthly Walton Writers group and is on the MWCA Board as Literary Arts Chair. Barth is a contributor to Walton Living Magazine and a former blogger for The Balancing Act, Lifetime Television’s morning show for women. Currently she lives with six dogs - rescue dogs that rescued her. 

For more on Barbara Barth, visit her website at https://www.barbarabarthwriter.com/ 
Her books are available on Amazon and Kindle. Amazon author page: https://www.amazon.com/Barbara-Barth/e/B0049M0IXO

Comments

Barbara Barth said…
Thanks for such a lovely review of my book. Waiting to see what my seventies bring! Hope your holidays are wonderful. Barbara

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